Fresh Flower Larkspur Flower History
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Flower History
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Larkspur Flower History

Celebrate July birthdays with the larkspur, also known as "Elijah's Chariot," the flower of attachment, devotion and sincerity.   Related to buttercups, these flowers are members of the Ranunculaceae family and make up the genus Consolida – which contains around 40 varieties that are native to mild climates.   It used to be thought that larkspur were delphiniums, but they are separated by the fact that larkspur are annual plants while delphiniums are perennial. 

A bit of a hypocrite, larkspur's mildly-poisonous flower is considered to be an antidote to poisonous stings.   It is also used as an insecticide in the U.K., having been introduced there in the late 1700s.  The North American plains are strewn with their blooms every spring through summer.  

It is said that Larkspur first sprouted after the famous Battle of Troy.  The warrior Ajax was supposed to receive slain Achilles' armor, but took his own life when the honor was passed to another warrior. On the spot where his blood pooled, it is told, there grew the first Larkspur.  

Larkspur is a beautiful addition to floral arrangements.  In fact, it is one of the most sought after plants for dried flower arrangements.   Its petals can be white or pastel pink to purple and grow in loose groups above feathery leaves.  Their height varies, dependant upon variety, from two to seven feet.  

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