Fresh Flower Calendula Flower History
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Flower History
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Calendula Flower History

To plant Calendula, either purchase not-yet-flowering flats from a local nursery or sow seeds directly in the ground after any danger of frost has passed.   Soil should be mulched so it retains moisture for the developing roots.  These flowers appreciate cool temperatures and fertilized, nutrient-rich soil, but they survive nicely under poor conditions.   

Calendula will grow to be a foot or two in height.  Its blooms are usually yellow or orange and similar to strawflowers.   These flowers have the unique tendency to follow the sun throughout the day.  Spent blooms should be pinched off for repeat color, and the plant should be pulled and composted if it starts to look worn.  

Calendula blossoms are hugely medicinal and have been recognized as such for centuries.   Florets are dried in the summer shade and made into different remedies.  An ancient beverage was brewed with the petals and taken to relieve indigestion.   Ointment made from the blooms were said to cure skin or eye irritations and toothaches.  Florets are antiseptic, astringent, and antioxidant.   They relieve inflammation and muscle spasms.  They are also used to heal open wounds and prevent hemorrhaging. 

This flower gets its name from the Latin word meaning: "through the months."  It certainly has proven to be a tried and true addition to any herb garden.  Calendula is edible and used to add color or flavor to salads, soups and other foods.   It also has religious connotations after being used in different cultures to adorn the heads of religious statues.

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